Things you should see.

Archive for October, 2010

Oddsfish: Blowing Android

I can’t think of a better caption for this, so there you have it..


Nulreview: Fallout New Vegas

Fallout: New Vegas

Obsidian Entertainment is well known for making the sequels to high profile RPGs. However unlike Neverwinter Nights 2 or Knights of the Old Republic 2, Fallout: New Vegas is not the sequel to somebody else’s game. Obsidian started the Fallout series, back when they worked at Black Isle Studios, so this is essentially a dev retaking the reigns of the franchise they created. Question is; how did they do?

Fallout: New Vegas is simultaneously one of the best RPGs I’ve ever played while also being one of the buggiest and worst presented products I’ve ever had the misfortune of experiencing. This is the dichotomy presented in most reviews; the game does not disappoint the lofty expectations of Fallout 3 fans and is in many ways better than that game, but also brings along for the ride Gamebryo Engine bugginess many times worse than what we saw in FO3 or even Oblivion.

So it’s ultimately a mixed bag. On the one hand I love this game to bits, but find it hard to recommend due to the sheer disregard for the player with which it has been released. Did anyone test this mess? Is there a QA department at Bethesda Softworks at all? No doubt this will be polished to a fine sheen many patches and DLC packs down the track, but even then why should anyone buy it now if they can get a more complete and more stable version in the inevitable GOTY edition a year or so from now?

Me? I caved and bought it. Obviously.

 

But if you suspend your disbelief and ignore the game’s technical shortcomings, New Vegas is still full of stand-out moments. Discovering the Brotherhood Of Steel’s underground hideout and getting embroiled in the sinister political inner-workings of their organisation is a quest on a par with Fallout 3’s best, with dozens of potential outcomes. – T3

Like Obsidian’s other big-name sequel – KOTOR 2 – Fallout: New Vegas is a divisive game. So much remains of what made Fallout 3 special, from the ridiculous cast to the joy of exploration, that there will be many willing to overlook all the bugs and glitches in favour of the weight of content that lies beneath. Those who were hoping for more than a mission pack to a 2008 game built on a busted 2006 engine, however, may find new Vegas to be quite literally a wasteland. – Kotaku

It doesn’t look as good as Fallout 3 did, and perhaps that’s down to internal support at Bethesda knowing the engine better than their outsourced pals, but it shows, and doesn’t help when Obsidian are known for lacking in the polish department. I was lucky enough to avoid any full crashes (though my house-mates have suffered these), but dodgy texture load-ins, massive frame-rate drops, out of sync voice work and alarmingly close pop-up have actually marred the experience for me. It is a detriment when you invest so much into the world, lore and characters and I’m hoping some serious patch work is released as soon as possible. – Ausgamers

If New Vegas were being reviewed as a piece of software, as a technical product, the judgement would be absolutely appalling. These are games, however, and deserve to be reviewed for the experiences they provide. The experience of New Vegas is sublime and so incredibly big that the ratio between getting annoyed by freezes and getting excited by the game’s wonderfully engaging world firmly favors a positive outlook. Very few games could be good enough to make up for serious technical errors. In fact, I could count them on one hand. – Destructoid

Fallout: New Vegas is still a fantastic game, only slightly held back by its increasingly outdated tech. Obsidian has created a totally compelling world and its frustrations pale into insignificance compared to the immersive, obsessive experience on offer. Just like the scorched scenery that provides its epic backdrop, New Vegas is huge and sprawling, sometimes gaudy, even downright ugly at times – but always effortlessly, shamelessly entertaining. – Eurogamer


Oddsfish: Fallout at Berry Square

A well positioned Fallout: New Vegas poster.

Working in advertising, I oftentimes see things which may seem strange to the layperson, but make sense to me, since I know how all the convoluted workings behind the scenes. Optus’ short-lived ‘Unlimited’ Moose campaign, for example. This is not one of those times. I’m talking about Fallout: New Vegas, the recently released PC game whose not one, not two, but five individual illuminated panels in North Sydney’s Berry Square boggle me.

It’s unusual for a couple of reasons. 1) You rarely see ‘above the line’ advertising for video games in Australia, unless it’s something like Call of Duty. 2) There is not a single place that sells video games in the centre. Not an EB Games, not a JB Hifi. Not even a K-mart or anything like that.

I wonder which media agency represents publisher Namco-Bandai (yeh, they published it here). Whoever they are, this is the most baffling media placement I’ve seen in some time. Well done, guys. It’s even more questionable since Greenwood Plaza, also in North Sydney, does have an EB Games. It however has no panels advertising Fallout while Berry Square has a staggering five- more if you count both sides of the stand as individual surfaces (how they’re billed). Oddsfish.

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Preview: Path of Exile

Path of Exile

Path of Exile has put a smile on my face. With all the post-Blizzcon chatter about Diablo III I got to thinking ‘where did all these Diablo-clones come from?’ In what was just a few years ago an almost extinct genre, it seems like a flood of wannabes has appeared out of nowhere following the announcement of Blizzard’s highly anticipated sequel. Path of Exile is a Diablo clone, but in this exception to the rule, I intend it as a complement. Developed by New Zealand’s Grinding Gear Games, it looks to not only aspire to Diablo, but to surpass it. The game will be online-only. It will free to play. And it also seems to be Diablo on steroids in every way imaginable.

Although a closed beta is planned for early 2011, Path of Exile will ship later that year with 6 classes. Two have been revealed to date; the Marauder and Ranger. Each fits one of the now well known ARPG archetypes, but not quite. They have their own spin on the class and so this makes predicting what has yet to be announced somewhat difficult. You can’t discount the tank, since the Marauder is not quite a tank. The Ranger is not quite typical ranged DPS either… why? I’ll get to that in a moment. Grinding Gear has promised against purely support classes, like Priests or Monks, but I’m more interested in what unique classes could arise from Path of Exile’s unique underlying mechanics than simple direct-damage dealers.

poe4     poe9

I say that because combat in Path of Exile belies a secret depth. Frost novas, firebolts and trademark ‘Barbarian’ skills like leap seem to have made it in. So have the enemies- there’s everything from humanoids, wild beasts and the prerequisite undead shamblers in what has been revealed so far. What makes the system unique, and isn’t immediately apparent, is that magic isn’t learnt or part of a class’ skill tree. No, all skills are granted by ‘materia-like’ gems socketed into armour. One gem might grant a firebolt, for example. However that gem, combined with another in a neighbouring socket might change that one bolt per cast into three. Or make it bigger. Or add armour-penetrating properties. And they can be used by any class. Let that sink in for a second. I’ve maligned the freedom in character-building that was lost between Diablo I and II; this game not only restores that level of customisation but goes a step further too.

    

Customisability doesn’t end there either; loot plays as important a role as ever in Path of Exile. Randomised drops, dungeons and bosses, supported by a persistent online world with a persistent in-game economy, all promise the obsessive gear-collecting fondly remembered and now expected of action RPGs.

Environments are suitably varied. Ruins, forests and so forth are standard fair, but Path of Exile seems to avoid Diablo II’s trap of an ever-brightening colour palate in diversifying locales. Even the sunsoaked coastline in the trailer manages to feel as hostile and forbidding as any dungeon in the game. This in particular is a noteworthy feat given the ongoing controversy surrounding the art direction of Diablo III. And, of course, it’s all random.

poe7     poe5

The online world is hard to fathom so far before launch but the staples; PvP and the aforementioned item economy are promised features. All will be facilitated by the fact that Path of Exile runs entirely on the developers’ servers. While the game will be free to play, it will not be dominated by microtransaction-based advancement. Developers have gone to lengths to emphasise purchasable items will be cosmetic only and will not provide any advantage to players with deeper pockets. This is always the way to go, but unfortunately an area in which all too many online games stumble. Here’s hoping Grinding Gear can stick to their convictions on this point.

All in all Path of Exile shows genuine promise, especially for a game that will be free to play. What the team has assembled stands as one of the most impressive entrees in what is rapidly becoming an overpopulated genre. I can only hope the title doesn’t lose any of its lustre between now and its live date sometime next year. Meanwhile, I’ll cross my fingers for a beta key and eagerly await the chance to take a closer look at this little gem. Until then, take a look at some of the impressive gameplay trailers released so far;

 

 

 

 

Just a disclaimer; as much as I wish they would, Grinding Gear Games has not invited me to formally preview this game. My views here are formed entirely from their public trailers and the write ups at Incgamers, PCGamer & Joystiq.


Diablo III @ Blizzcon 2010 – Crafting Sanctuary Panel

Diablo III Logo

Today’s panel, ‘Crafting Sanctuary’ continued Diablo III’s coverage at Blizzcon 2010. Design issues such as visual design, level layout, loot, AI, UI and the Artisans were all covered in some depth. Here are the videos;

 

 

 

 

For those who don’t recall, Artisans were revealed as travelling craftsmen earlier this year at GamesCon. Here’s Jay Wilson’s walkthrough from that event;


Diablo III @ Blizzcon 2010 – The Battle Arena

The Battle Arena 

Diablo III’s first form of Player-Vs-Player competition was revealed today in the form of ‘Battle Arenas’. Described as small scale team PvP, Battle Arenas are progression- and rewards-based with a focus on teamwork overcoming individual class imbalances. It was also suggested that PvP would utilised the same gear as PvE, but different skill specialisations via Skill Runes would define specs differently. An Obsidian rune might add a stun effect to a skill that would be more useful in PvP than outside of it, for example. Also matches would be in rounds, so that players have time to understand the enemy team composition and formulate strategies.

Here’s a sample of a Battle Arena team deathmatch;

 

 

Visit the PvP section of the official Diablo III site for more information.


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